Roe v. Wade

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What is the significance of Roe v. Wade?

  2. Use Roe v. Wade in a sentence:

  3. Describe a connection to Roe v. Wade in current events:

  4. Find an image relating to Roe v. Wade:

Ten Fast Facts

 

Definition

Roe v. Wade 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is a landmark decision issued in 1973 by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of the constitutionality of laws that criminalized or restricted access to abortions. The Court ruled 7–2 that a right to privacy under the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment extended to a woman's decision to have an abortion, but that this right must be balanced against the state's interests in regulating abortions: protecting women's health and protecting the potentiality of human life.

Sentence

Roe v. Wade has been one of the most controversial rulings in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. More than forty years after the decision, It continues to be a major issue in American political elections.

AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics

Video

Audio


Questions

  1. What is the Constitutional basis for the ruling in roe v. Wade?

  2. What was the most significant consequence of the ruling in Roe v. Wade?

  3. What cases before roe served as precedent for the Roe v. Wade ruling?

  4. How different would the U.S. be without the Roe v. Wade ruling?

  5. Do you think Roe v. Wade will be overturned?

AP Studio Art

Now draw Roe v. Wade! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Learn about all 15 Landmark Supreme Court Cases

The United States Constitution

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think The U.S. Constitution is about?

  2. Use The U.S. Constitution in a sentence that might help get you a date to the prom.

  3. Think of an example of the The U.S. Constitution in current events:

  4. Find an image of The U.S. Constitution :

Fun Fact

Definition

The U.S. Constitution: The Constitution of the United States established America's national government and fundamental laws, and guaranteed certain basic rights for its citizens. It was signed on September 17, 1787, by delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. The present United States Constitution replaced the Articles of Confederation on March 4, 1789.

Sentence

The United States Constitution is an amazing document.  A bold experiment in democracy more than 200 years ago, it has proved both stable and flexible enough to survive and remain effective in a world totally different from the one in which it was written.

Example

Constitution's 'excessive fines' ban bolstered by U.S. high court

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Questions

  1. What set the rules of our government before the Constitution?

  2. Why did the Framers write the Constitution?

  3. Why do you think the Constitution has been able to survive for so long?

  4. What is your favorite legislative, executive, or judicial power in the Constitution?

AP Studio Art

Now draw The U.S. Constitution! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Bureaucratic Rule-Making

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think bureaucratic rule-making means?

  2. Use bureaucratic rule-making in a sentence:

  3. Describe an example of bureaucratic rule-making in current events:

  4. Find an image of bureaucratic rule-making:

Fun Fact

 

Definition

Bureaucratic Rule-Making: The federal bureaucracy makes rules that affect how programs operate, and these rules must be obeyed, just as if they were laws. The rule-making process for government agencies occurs in stages. After Congress passes new regulatory laws, the agency charged with implementing the law proposes a series of rules, which are published in the Federal Register. Interested parties can comment on the rules, either at public hearings or by submitting documents to the agency. After the agency publishes the final regulations, it must wait sixty days before enforcing those rules. During that time, Congress can review and change the rules if it desires. If Congress makes no changes, the rules go into effect at the end of sixty days. Here’s how the bureaucratic rule-making process is laid out in the Federal Register.

Sentence

While bureaucrats writing regulations and rule-making may seem like a violation of the separation of powers fundamental to the American government, federal agencies may enact rules solely within the statutory authority granted to them by Congress. These administrative laws allow regular citizens to have a greater influence on regulations that could directly impact them. Citizens are given opportunities to propose rule language and comment on language agencies propose.

Example

Responsiveness and durability: An analysis of the Accountability and State Plans rule

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AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics

Video

Bureaucratic Rule-Making from Khan Academy


Questions

  1. Should the executive branch be making rules? Isn’t that the legislative branch’s job?

  2. What would happen to the American policy-making system if bureucratic rule-making were outlawed?

  3. In what way is bureaucratic rule-making democratic and in what way is it not?

AP Studio Art

Now draw bureaucratic rule-making! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

White House Staff

Prediction

  1. What do you think White House Staff means?

  2. Use White House Staff in an unprecedentedly fantastic sentence.

  3. Find an example of White House Staff in current events:

  4. Find an image of White House Staff :

Fun Fact

Definition

The White House Staff is an entity within the Executive Office of the President of the United States. The White House Office is headed by the White House Chief of Staff, who is also the head of the Executive Office of the President. The White House Staff advise the president and help the president carry out his responsibilities.

History

Over most of U.S. history cabinet secretaries have been among the most important formal advisers to presidents, and they exercised important managerial roles in implementing government policies and programs. With the large expansion of the government’s role in the economy in reaction to the Great Depression, Congress provided authority for the creation of the White House staff, which was formalized in the creation of the Executive Office of the President in 1939. The official White House staff began with six advisers to the president, but Presidents Truman and Eisenhower continued to rely heavily on their cabinet secretaries for policy advice.

Sentence

President Obama continued the 20th century trend of centralizing control in the White House staff, ensuring the frustration of cabinet secretaries.

Example

Cabinet secretaries versus the White House staff

Image

Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 1.16.45 PM.png

VIDEO

QUESTIONS

  1. What is the primary job of the White House Staff?

  2. Must embers of the White House Staff be confirmed by the Senate?

  3. Who hires and fires the White House Staff?

  4. How is the White House Staff different from the Cabinet?

AP Studio Art

Now draw the White House Staff! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. You could just draw an org chart of who is in the staff. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. The White House Staff. That’s all. You won!

U.S. v. Lopez

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What is the significance of U.S. v. Lopez?

  2. Use U.S. v. Lopez in a sentence:

  3. Describe a connection to U.S. v. Lopez in current events:

  4. Find an image of U.S. v. Lopez:

Ten Fast Facts

 

Definition

U.S. v Lopez was a 1995 landmark Supreme Court case that limited the use of the Commerce Clause. The (5-4) verdict ruled that the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990 was unconstitutional because the U.S. Congress, in enacting the legislation, had exceeded its authority under the commerce clause.

Sentence

When the Gun-Free School Zone Act was passed in 1990, there were few limits on the Congress’s use of the Commerce Clause as the constitutional basis for regulation.

AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics

Video

Audio


Questions

  1. List some other significant Supreme Court cases that deal with the powers of the Commerce Clause.

  2. What was the most significant consequence of the ruling in U.S. v. Lopez?

  3. In what was has the ruling in U.S. v. Lopez impacted your and your education?

  4. How different would the U.S. be without the U.S. v. Lopez ruling?

AP Studio Art

Now draw U.S. v. Lopez! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Learn about all 15 Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Brown v. Board of Education

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What is the significance of Brown v. Board of Education?

  2. Use Brown v. Board of Education in a sentence:

  3. Describe an connection to Brown v. Board of Education in current events:

  4. Find an image of Brown v. Board of Education:

Ten Fast Facts

 

Definition

Brown v. Board of Education was a 1954 landmark Supreme Court case that overturned the doctrine of separate but equal. In a unanimous ruling the Supreme Court ruled that segrEgation of public schools was unconstitutional, thus beginning the integration of public schools.

Sentence

At the time of the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, 17 southern and border states, along with the District of Columbia, required their public schools to be racially segregated.

AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics

Video


Questions

  1. What Supreme Court case was overturned by the ruling in Brown v. Board?

  2. What was the most significant consequence of the ruling in Brown v. Board?

  3. In what was has the ruling in Brown v. Board impacted you and your education?

  4. How different would the U.S. be without the Brown ruling?

  5. Describe how integrated your school is today.

AP Studio Art

Now draw Brown v. Board! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Learn about all 15 Landmark Supreme Court Cases

Linkage Institutions

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think linkage institution means?

  2. Use linkage institution in a sentence:

  3. Describe an example of linkage institution in current events:

  4. Find an image of linkage institution:

Fun Fact

 

Definition

Linkage Institution: are informal groups that connect citizens to the government. They are not officially a part of the government, but are vital to maintaining democracy. These groups in American politics include the following: Political Parties, Campaigns + Elections, Interest Groups, and the Media.

Sentence

There is some argument about which linkage institution does the best job of connecting citizens to the government, but it is clear that without the media, there would be a dangerous lack of knowledge of what the U.S. government is doing.

Example

How Is The Shutdown Affecting America? Let Us Count The Ways

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AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics

Video


Questions

  1. Which linkage institution do you think pays the most vital role in preserving democracy?

  2. Why is Congress not considered a linkage institution?

  3. Do you feel like linkage institutions are more empowering to the citizens or to the government?

  4. If we lived in a direct democracy in a very small country would we need linkage institutions?

  5. Imagine a country without linkage institutions and evaluate the level of democracy that would be possible?

AP Studio Art

Now draw Linkage Institutions! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Federalist No. 51

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think Federalist No. 51 is about?

  2. Use Federalist No. 51 in a sentence that wouldn’t get you kicked out of a McDonald’s.

  3. Think of an example of the ideas from Federalist No. 51 in current events:

  4. Find an image of Federalist No. 51 :

Fun Fact

Definition

Federalist No. 51: The Federalist Papers were a series of eighty-five essays urging the citizens of New York to ratify the new United States Constitution. Written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, the essays originally appeared anonymously in New York newspapers in 1787 and 1788 under the pen name "Publius."

Federalist No. 51 addresses means by which appropriate checks and balances can be created in government and also advocates a separation of powers within the national government. This idea of checks and balances became a crucial document in the establishment of the modern U.S. system of checks and balances.

The present United States Constitution replaced the Articles of Confederation on March 4, 1789.

Sentence

Federalist No. 51 laid out arguments as to why we need checks and balances with the famous quotes, "Ambition must be made to counteract ambition," and “If men were angels, no government would be necessary.

Example

Congress Is Not a Coequal Branch of Government — It’s Supreme

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Questions

  1. Why did the author(s) (Publius) write the federalist papers?

  2. What was the main point Publius made in Federalist No. 51?

  3. If The Federalist Papers aren’t a part of the Constitution, why do federal judges often quote them in their rulings?

  4. If the Federalist papers had NOT been written and the Constitution had not been ratified, how different would our country be today?

AP Studio Art

Now draw Federalist No. 51! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Politico

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think politico means?

  2. Use politico in a sentence:

  3. Describe an example of politico in current events:

  4. Find an image of politico:

Fun Fact

 

Definition

Politico: elected representatives must make political decisions about how to vote. A politicians is called a trustee when they follow their own best judgement, and a delegate when they follow the will of the people. A politico plays the role of delegate when the people feel strongly about an issue, and plays the role of trustee when public opinion is muted. This representative who combines these two approaches to public office depending upon the circumstance is known as a politico.

Sentence

Senator Slapphappy is such a politico. She listens to the people back in Wyoming when they are really concerned about an issue, but when they are not paying attention to a certain issue, she does whatever she wants.

Example

Trump, Romney Flip-Flop on Immigration and Each Other

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AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics


Questions

  1. What is the main difference between the delegate, trustee, and politico model of representation?

  2. List a politician who strongly follows the delegate, trustee, or politico model of representation:

  3. If you were a politician would you be more likely to follow the delegate, trustee, or politico model of representation?

  4. Of the delegate, trustee, or politico model of representation, which is the most democratic?

AP Studio Art

Now draw Politico! Take 10 or 20 seconds. That’s all you need. Nothing fancy. Don’t expect a masterpiece. Draw with symbols or stick figures if you wish. Now Look at your drawing. You’ve got it. That’s all.

Conference Committee

U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think conference committee means?

  2. Use conference committee in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of conference committee in current events:

  4. Find an image of conference committee:

Fun Fact

Definition

Conference Committee: A temporary, ad hoc panel composed of House and Senate conferees which is formed for the purpose of reconciling differences in legislation that has passed both chambers. Conference committees are usually convened to resolve bicameral differences on major and controversial legislation.

Sentence

When the Senate and the House pass different versions of a bill, Congress must convene a conference committee to reconcile the differences.

Example

Conservatives Get Their Shot to Change the Republican Health-Care Bill

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AP US Government and Politics

AP US Government and Politics

Questions

  1. When does the Congress call a conference committee?

  2. What happens after the conference committee reaches agreement on a bill?

  3. How often does Congress end up with conference committees?

Docket

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think docket means?

  2. Use docket in a sentence that will Make America Great Again.

  3. Think of an example of docket in current events:

  4. Find an image of docket:

  5. List one word that rhymes with docket:

Fun Fact

Definition

Docket: The list of potential cases that reach the Supreme Court. You can search the SCOTUS docket right here right now.

Sentence

The Supreme Court docket has been much smaller under the conservative Roberts Court than it was under the activist Warren Court.

Example

Legal scholarship highlight: An empirical analysis of the Court’s shrinking docket

Image

Rhyme Thyme

Pocket, Locket, Lock it, Unlock it, Roquette, Socket, Rocket, Rockette, Sock it, Hock it, Mock it, Knock it, Wockit!

Questions

  1. Who determines what gets on the SCOTUS docket?

  2. About how many cases are on the SCOTUS docket to be heard each year?

  3. Which is the worst rhyming word with docket?

  4. Why would liberal/activists tend to want to hear more cases than conservative justices?

Office of Management and Budget

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think Office of Management and Budget (OMB) means?

  2. Use Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in a good old fashioned all-American sentence.

  3. Think of an example of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in current events:

  4. Find an image of Office of Management and Budget (OMB):

Fun Fact

Definition

The Office of Management and Budget: is a presidential staff agency that serves as a clearing-house for budgetary requests and management improvements for government agencies.  Mick Mulvaney is the current director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OMB is par tof the Executive Office of the President.

The Office of Management and Budget should not to be confused with the Office of Banishment and Muggles, nor should OMB be confused with OMD, Orchestral Maneuvers in the Dark, an 80s band that the mere mention of will make your teacher blush.

Sentence

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) serves the President of the United States in overseeing the implementation of his vision across the Executive Branch.

Example

White House wants to strip existing infrastructure funds to divert them to its own infrastructure plan

Image

Question

  1. What is the primary job of the OMB?

  2. Who appoints the head of the OMB?

  3. Is there any agency in the US that has a more important job while at the same time, being less well known?

Articles of Confederation

AP US Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think Articles of Confederation means?

  2. Use Articles of Confederation in a sentence that you wouldn't be embarrassed for the FBI to investigate.

  3. Think of an example of Articles of Confederation in current events:

  4. Find an image of Articles of Confederation:

Fun Fact

Definition

Articles of Confederation: The Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, the first constitution of the United States, on November 15, 1777. However, ratification of the Articles of Confederation by all thirteen states did not occur until March 1, 1781. The Articles created a loose confederation of sovereign states and a weak central government, leaving most of the power with the state governments. The need for a stronger Federal government soon became apparent and eventually led to the Constitutional Convention in 1787. The present United States Constitution replaced the Articles of Confederation on March 4, 1789.

Sentence

The Articles of Confederation were great as long as America didn't actually have to do anything.

Example

Republicans and the Constitution

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Questions

  1. How united were the states under the Articles of Confederation?

  2. What were two flaws in the Articles of Confederation?

  3. Why don't we still have the Articles of Confederation as the US Constitution?

  4. Would we be better off if the USA were bound less tightly, the states had most of the power, and the federal government had little power?

Libertarianism

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think libertarianism means?

  2. Use libertarianism in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of libertarianism in current events:

  4. Find an image of libertarianism:

Fun Fact

Definition

Libertarianism: an ideology that cherishes individual liberty and insists on minimal government, promoting a free market economy, a non-interventionist foreign policy, and an absence of regulation in moral, economic, and social life. An extreme laissez-faire political philosophy advocating only minimal state intervention in the lives of citizens. Or, as American Libertarians say in their party platform preamble, "we seek a world of liberty; a world in which all individuals are sovereign over their own lives and no one is forced to sacrifice his or her values for the benefit of others." You can take this nifty short Libertarian Quiz, but remember, the Libertarians made the quiz so it will push you in a certain direction, and they will decide how you score. Still, worth taking!

Sentence

Since Ricky Bobby was a Libertarian he supported the right of gay couples to smoke marijuana while they bought guns.

Example

The End of the Libertarian Dream?

Image

Take this with a grain of salt.

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Ha!

AP U.S. Government and Politics

 

Questions

  1. What is one thing a libertarian would strongly believe in?

  2. In what ways is Donald J. Trump a Libertarian and in what ways is he not?

  3. Can you list one well known Libertarian?

  4. How similar are your beliefs to Libertarianism?

  5. If you were a Libertarian and had to choose between a generic Democrat and a Republican presidential candidate. Which would you most likely chose and why?

  6. Why do Libertarians generally favor legalization of many drugs?

Survey
Survey
I am a Libertarian.
Option One

Liberalism

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think liberalism means?

  2. Use liberalism in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of liberalism in current events:

  4. Find an image of liberalism:

Fun Fact

Definition

Liberalism: an ideology that government can and should achieve justice and equality of opportunity. the belief in the value of social and political change in order to achieve progress.

Sentence

One reason that many traditionally disempowered   groups favor liberalism is its emphasis on change.

Example

Liberalism Needs the “Alt-Left”

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AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Questions

  1. What is one thing a liberal would strongly believe in?

  2. Liberalism is only a few letters off from libertarianism. What is the main way it is different?

  3. Can you list one well known liberal?

  4. How similar are your beliefs to liberalism? What is the biggest difference between liberalism and conservatism?

Conservativism

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think conservatism means?

  2. Use conservatism in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of conservatism in current events:

  4. Find an image of conservatism:

Fun Fact

Definition

Conservatism: an ideology that limited government ensures order, competitive markets, and personal opportunity. A commitment to traditional values and ideas with opposition to change or innovation. And the holding of political views that favor free enterprise, private ownership, and socially conservative ideas.

Sentence

Ever since Junior could remember, Pee-Paw had been a strong conservative with traditional American family values. Pee-Paw ha festooned his home with Conservative sayings. His living room was home to the Thomas Jefferson quote, "That government is best which governs least, because its people discipline themselves." The Reagan quote, "government is not the solution to our problem. Government is our problem." And the Guns N' Roses quote, "Welcome to the Jungle!" Junior, being liberal in his thinking, never did like to visit his Pee-Paw very much.

Example

The Health-Care Debacle Was a Failure of Conservatism

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AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Questions

  1. What is one thing a conservative would strongly believe in?

  2. In what ways is Donald J. Trump a conservative and in what ways is he not?

  3. Can you list one well known conservative?

  4. How similar are your beliefs to conservatism?

Extradition

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think extradition means?

  2. Use extradition in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of extradition in current events:

  4. Find an image of extradition:

Fun Fact

Definition

Extradition: A legal process whereby an alleged criminal offender is surrendered by the officials of one state to officials of the state in which the crime is alleged to have been committed.

Sentence

While imprisoned in Mexico, El Chapo Guzmán was indicted in San Diego on drug-trafficking and money-laundering charges. Apparently fearing extradition, he bribed guards to help him escape in 2001 by hiding in a laundry cart that was rolled out of the prison.

Example

Death on a Prison Bus: Extradition Companies’ Safety Improvements Lag

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AP U.S. Government and Politics

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Questions

  1. What does extradition have to do with federalism?

  2. If you get extradited twice is that an extraextradition?

  3. What is one US agency that is involved in extradition?

  4. What would happen if extradition was not legal?

Precedent

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think precedent means? Pro tip, I'm not talking about when a southerner says, "president."

  2. Use precedent in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of precedent in current events:

  4. Find an image of precedent:

Fun Fact

Definition

Precedent: A decision made by a higher court such as a circuit court of appeals or the Supreme Court that is binding in all other federal courts. A legal decision or form of proceeding serving as an authoritative rule or pattern in future similar or analogous cases. any act, decision, or case that serves as a guide or justification for subsequent situations. 

Sentence

The ruling in Brown v. Board set the precedent that legally, schools could no longer be segregated.

Example

The Garland Precedent Should Not Stop Gorsuch

 

Image

AP U.S. Government and Politics

 

Questions

  1. What is a famous precedent set by the Supreme Court?

  2. Can the US Supreme Court overturn a precedent?

  3. What is an example of the Supreme Court overturning precedent?

  4. If the Supreme Court sets a precedent involving a president, what do you call that?

Congressional Budget Office

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think Congressional Budget Office (CBO) means?

  2. Use Congressional Budget Office (CBO) in a sentence that would impress any first-date.

  3. Think of an example of Congressional Budget Office (CBO) in current events:

  4. Find an image of Congressional Budget Office (CBO): They have a really cool logo!

Fun Fact

Definition

Congressional Budget Office (CBO): A nonpartisan agency of Congress that analyzes presidential budget recommendations and estimates the costs of proposed legislation. CBO provides Congress with analyses for economic and budget decisions and with estimates required for the Congressional budget process.

Sentence

The non-partisan CBO issues a score on major pieces of legislation so that legislators can know the costs of any laws they pass.

Example

What is the CBO, and why does its ‘score’ on the Obamacare repeal matter?
 

Image

AP U.S. Government and Politics

 

Questions

  1. What does the CBO do?

  2. What do we mean when we say that the CBO is nonpartisan?

  3. What branch of government is the CBO in?

  4. What would be one consequence of eliminating the Congressional Budget Office?

  5. If the Congress decided to eliminate the CBO, would the CBO issue a score on the cost of its own elimination?

  6. Would the CBO logo make a better television station, website, or band logo?

  7. Imagine you were starting a business with the initials: CBO. What would you want CBO to stand for?

Clear & Present Danger Test

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prediction

  1. What do you think clear and present danger test means?

  2. Use clear and present danger test in a sentence.

  3. Think of an example of clear and present danger test in current events:

  4. Find an image of clear and present danger test:

Fun Fact

Definition

Clear and Present Danger Test: An interpretation of the First Amendment that holds that the government cannot interfere with speech unless the speech presents a clear and present danger that it will lead to evil or illegal acts. Writing for the Supreme Court in Schenck v United States, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes asked whether "the words create a clear and present danger that they will bring about substantive evils Congress has a right to prevent?" 

Sentence

In handing down his ruling on freedom of speech, Justice Holmes wrote that yelling "fire!" in a crowded movie theater would create a clear and present danger.

Example

Why journalists should care about two indicted anti-abortion activists

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AP U.S. Government and Politics

Stupid Han Solo Movie by the Same Name

 

Questions

  1. What Supreme Court case did the Clear and Present Danger Test come from?

  2. Can you think of a current clear and present danger analogy to yelling fire in a crowded movie theater?

  3. Do you think that speech that causes a clear and present danger should be allowed?