Suburban Voters

AP US Government and Politics

We know that most urban voters are Democrats and most rural voters are Republicans. But are suburban voters more likely to identify as Democrats or Republicans?

AP US Government and Politics

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What has happened to Republican support in urban areas over the past 20 years?

  3. What is one cause of this urban tilt?

  4. What has happened to Democratic support in rural areas over the past 20 years?

  5. What is one cause of this rural tilt?

  6. How much does the data in the chart accurately describe the place where you live?

  7. If you had to make a statement regarding party affiliation of rural versus urban voters what would it be?

  8. Can you think of a mnemonic device to help remember your party affiliation statement from question 7?

  9. Why do you think rural voters are so pro-Republican?

  10. Why do you think urban voters are so pro-Democratic?

  11. Based on the data above, what information do we need to know in order to predict the outcome of an election?

  12. It's a fact that people who register as independents generally vote for the same party year after year in elections. Why do these people who regularly lean in one direction register as independents?

  13. What is one advantage to registering as a member of a political party?

  14. Can non-citizens vote in federal elections?*

  15. Can non-citizens run for federal office?*

  16. Can naturalized citizens become U.S. Representatives or Senators?*

  17. Can naturalized citizens become U.S. President?*

  18. If subhumans are less than human, are suburbanites less than urbanites?

  19. What is one consequence of this big rural urban divide in America?

  20. How much has this urban/rural party affiliation divide grown over the past two decades, and if it continues, what will this urban/rural party affiliation divide look like in two more decades?

  21. How has this urban/rural divide impacted the Trump presidency?

*Answers

11. No

12. No

13. Yes

14. Heck No!

Visual Extension

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Learning Extension

Check out all the fabulous charts in the Pew Research Center report on trends in party affiliation.

Action Extension

Create a mnemonic device to remember the party affiliation leanings of Americans based on race, gender, education, and generation. Share your mnemonic in class or online.

Cartoon Extension

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Our World In Data Extension

Our Animals in Clothing Extension

Age Voting Gap

Young voters (18-34) are predicted to vote at a higher rate than they did in the 2014 midterm election. But what is this year’s midterm voter turnout predicted to be for young voters compared to voters age 65 and older?

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  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. According to the data, what is this year’s midterm voter turnout predicted to be for young voters compared to voters age 65 and older?

  3. What are three reasons for that?

  4. What is the big story this data tells?

  5. What most surprised you about this data?

  6. What is one consequence of this difference in voter turnout?

  7. How do you think these voter turnout rates compare to elections past?

  8. Describe three U.S. policies that would change if 32% of all midterm voters were young people, and only 13% were 65 and over?

  9. Explain why those policies would change?

  10. There is a minimum age for voting, should there be a maximum age?

  11. Across all age groups, voters are registered in roughly similar numbers. Why does that same rate of voter registration not translate to the same rate of voter turnout in midterm elections?

  12. Are midterm elections especially for old people?

  13. If the largest share of voter turnout in midterm elections came from young people, how would that impact US political campaigns?

  14. Some states have made it more difficult for young people to vote (for example, my state, NC, has made it particularly difficult for college students to vote). Why do you think that is?

  15. Do you think that more young people would vote if the candidates they could chose from were younger?

  16. Explain which party you think young voters are more likely to support.

  17. In the 2016 presidential election, the three leading candidates (Trump, Clinton, Sanders) would all have been above the age of 70 had they won the election. Why do you think that is?

  18. How do you think this age gap compares to voting gaps by race, sex, and socio-economic-status?

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Learning Extension

Read this Pew report on voting rates for Generation X and millennial voters

Action Extension

How old are the candidates running for federal office (House, Senate) in your district? Find out and share what you learned in class and online.

Baby Giraffe Extension

That’s a real baby giraffe, y’all!

That’s a real baby giraffe, y’all!

Listen, Do you want to know a secret?

What is the #1 place that 18-24-year-olds have heard about the 2018 midterm elections?

  1. How accurate was your pitiful guess?
    What most surprised you about this information?

  2. What story does this data tell?

  3. Why do you think that is?

  4. What is one consequence of this?

  5. Explain whether this Is good news.

  6. Rank the places 18-24-year-olds have heard about the 2018 midterm elections in terms of reliability.

  7. Of the places 18-24-year-olds have heard about the 2018 midterm elections, put a C next to the ones more likely to confirm that person’s bias; put a X next to the ones more likely to challenge that person’s bias.

  8. Of the places 18-24-year-olds have heard about the 2018 midterm elections, put a U next to the ones where you have heard about the midterm elections.

  9. Explain your thoughts about the fact that less than 1 in 5 of the people surveyed heard about the midterm elections in school.

  10. What do you think this information tells us about the likelihood of people age 18-24 voting in the election?

  11. How different would this list have been in 1900, 1800, and how different will it be in 2050?

  12. Describe how different this list would be for people over the age of 65.

  13. According to the chart, about 11% of people age 18-24 have not heard about the midterm election. How do you not hear about the midterm election?

  14. Is that good news?

  15. Is it good that they probably won’t vote?

  16. Is it their fault that they haven’t heard about the midterm?

  17. Upon reading this chart a student made the following claim": this is why there should be tests of voters’ knowledge before anyone is allowed to vote. Respond to that claim.

  18. Describe how this information will impact the Democratic and the Republican parties in the 2018 midterm.

  19. Based on the information in the chart, how do you think political parties target young voters?

Learning Extension

Read the CIRCLE report on midterm knowledge for young people.

Action Extension

If you will be under the age of 18 on November 6 you can’t vote. But in a way you can. Try to reach one person age 18-24, inform them about the election, convince them to vote, then convince them to vote the way you would vote if you could! If you will be 18 years old by November 6, vote!

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Voter Turnout of this World

over the past four years, What has happened to primary election voting turnout ?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What story does the data tell?

  3. Why do you think that is?

  4. What is a consequence of this?

  5. How does voter turnout between Republicans and Democrats compare?

  6. Why do you think that is?

  7. What impact do you think this difference will have on the 2018 midterm elections?

  8. Primary election voter turnout is way up, but overall, how would you characterize a turnout rate of 19.6% in U.S. House primary elections?

  9. When so few people vote, who wins?

  10. Who loses?

  11. Why do so few people vote?

  12. Describe some barriers to voting?

  13. Do most other democracies have primary elections?*

  14. Predict how you think the 2018 midterm election will end up?

  15. Read this totally amazing list of 11 ways to increase voter turnout and share your favorite one in the comments section below.

    *Nope

Visual Extension

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Learning Extension

Read this totally banned and explicit article on midterm voter turnout trends from the Pew Research Center.

Action Extension

Did you know that you can help turnout the vote? You can work for either the Republican Party or the Democratic Party or neither party to help get out the vote. That’s right! Get out the vote, and share your experience in class or online.

Ladder Extension

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Insane animal extension

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Changing Party Demographics Like It's 1999

AP US Government and Politics

In which of the following ways are Republican and Democratic voters most different: race, education, age?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What most surprised you about this data?

  3. What is the big story this data tells?

  4. What is one political consequence of these changes?

  5. What is one consequence of these changes on your life?

  6. For all voters, how much did the Hispanic voting group grow over the past 24 years?

  7. According to the data, what is the biggest way the Republican Party has changed?

  8. According to the data, what is the biggest way the Democratic Party has changed?

  9. Based on the changes from the chart, explain whether it would be fair to say that in a few years we are going to have two American political parties: the White Party and the Non-White Party?

  10. How do you think the Trump presidency will alter the party demographics over the next decade?

  11. Is the information from the chart good news or bad news?

  12. Based on the demographic changes described in the data, if you were trying to pick the winning team between the Democrats and Republicans. which one would you say would win?

  13. Based on the data in the chart what does the typical Republican voter look like?

  14. Based on the data in the chart, what does the typical Democratic voter look like?

  15. Between 1992 and 2016 both parties changed a lot. Which party changed more?

  16. Based on the changes of the past 24 years, what do you imagine these two parties will look like in 2040?

  17. in 1917 two of the most powerful countries in the world were the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire (even heard of them?). What is the likelihood that there will even be a United States of America in 2040?

Learning Extension

Oh my goodness. There are somany great charts about changing party trends on Snapchat, I mean the Pew Research Website. Check it out!!

Action Extension

Contact your national/state/local Republican or Democratic Party or just look at the Republican or Democratic  party platforms and ask them to tell you why you should join them instead of the other party. Share their comments and your thoughts about the two parties online or in class.

Watch this Prince Video and every time he is about to get to the chorus, sing "political" before he says "party like it's 1999." Everybody will think you are cool.

So Many Bonus Charts*

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