American Race

Whites are no longer the majority racial group in California. In what year will Whites cease to be the majority racial group in the entire US?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What's the big story this chart tells?

  3. Are these changes good news or bad news?

  4. In what way are the changes expressed in the chart reflected in your own life?

  5. What questions do you have about this chart?

  6. Make a prediction for what this chart will look like in 2080 America (if there is a 2080 America):

  7. What do you think is causing the changes reflected in the chart?

  8. What are some consequences of the changes reflected in the chart?

  9. How do you think the demographic changes reflected in this chart impacted the 2016 election?

  10. In the comments section, write about how the changes reflected in the chart are affecting politics in the US today.

Learning Extension

Check out these 10 charts on the changing face of America.

Action Extension

Find out the demographics of your county or city and make a comparison of your local data with the national data. Make a post comparing your hometown to the nation at large on social media with the hashtag #changingamerica

IncarceRACEion

How different are incarceration rates for Blacks and Whites in the US?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. How accurate do you think the average American would be?

  3. How surprising is this information?

  4. What is the take-home point of this chart?

  5. List two consequences of this huge disparity in incarceration rates for different races:

  6. What questions do you have about this?

  7. Why do you think there is such a huge disparity in incarceration rate for different races?

  8. Explain why these racial disparities in incarceration are not a bigger issue in the 2016 election or in American society, in general?

  9. Explain whether you think this chart is good or bad news:

  10. If you were to rename this chart, what would a good title be? Write the new title in the comments section below:

  11. What steps could the US government take to change these numbers?

  12. Prediction: What percent chance does a black male born in 1991 have of spending time in prison at some point in his life?*

Learning Extension

Here's a really cool interactive map from the Sentencing Project where you can find out more about your state's statistics on incarceration. One of the best works of non-fiction I've read in years is Michelle Alexander's inspiring The New Jim Crow, Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, part of which you can read for free on Google Books.

Action Extension

Share this information with friends and family, in person or on social media. Find out what they think about this (is it good, bad, changeable?) and share their responses with class.


Bonus Chart

Here's another way of looking at this information:

*A Black male born in 1991 has a 29% chance of spending time in prison at some point in his life.

Racing for Votes

AP US Government and Politics

When an area is over 85% White, how does that affect support for Trump?

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  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What story does this chart tell?

  3. Why is that?

  4. What is a consequence of this.

  5. How much did race impact the 2016 election?

  6. This chart comes from a New York Times article by Thomas Edsall. Here is a quote from the article: Dravosburg, Pa. is a small — population 1,746 — working-class suburb that lies along the Monongahela River 10 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. If we want to understand what actually propelled Donald Trump to victory last November, presidential voting patterns there provide a vital clue. In 2012, Dravosburg backed Barack Obama over Mitt Romney 441 to 312, or 53.4 percent to 44.8 percent. Four years later, the men and women of Dravosburg abandoned their Democratic loyalties and backed Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton, 56.3 to 41.1. In that light, look more closely at Dravosburg. In 2000, according to the United States Census Bureau, 1,989 out of 2,015 residents — 98.7 percent — were white; 10 were black; and 12 were Hispanic. By 2016, the census reported, the total population had fallen to 1,746 — 95.4 percent of them white. The number of blacks and Hispanics, still tiny, had grown rapidly, however, to 39 (a 290 percent increase), and to 25 (a 108 percent increase). What does this excerpt of the story mean to you?

  7. And how did this demographic change impact the election in Davosborg and other White super-majority enclaves?

  8. There have been studies showing that Americans who live in close proximity to diverse America (immigrants, refugees,  Muslims, etc.) have little fear of these groups, whereas people who live farther away from these groups feared them the most. Here;s a quote from Thomas Edsall, the author of the article this data comes from. "Put another way, anger, fear and animosity toward immigrants and minorities was most politically potent in the communities most insulated from these supposed threats." Why do you think that is?

  9. How much do you think fear drives politics?

  10. Had Donald Trump not been specifically racist and anti-immigrant do you think he would have won white enclaves like Dravosborg in the 2016 election?

  11. What specific rhetoric from the Trump campaign would the people of Dravosborg been especially excited about?

  12. What specific policy promises from the Trump campaign would the people of Dravosborg been especially excited about?

  13. How do you think residents of places like Dravosborg currently evaluate the success of President Trump in enacting the rhetoric or policy promises from the campaign?

  14. Explain whether many people in Dravosborg and Elks County have read this article by Thomas Edsall or regualrly read the New York Times?

  15. Do you think the folks from Dravosborg and Elks County will vote for Trump again in 2020?

  16. In 2012, Dravosburg backed Barack Obama over Mitt Romney 441 to 312, or 53.4 percent to 44.8 percent. Why do you think the residents of Dravosburg voted for Obama? And why did they like Trump more than Romney?

  17. Did you know that Mitt Romney, Republican candidate for President in 2012 got more votes than Trump got in 2016? I did. Here's how many more votes he got: Trump won 45.93 percent of the total vote last year, 1.2 percentage points less than Romney’s 47.1 percent in 2012. How could Trump have done worse than Romney and also won the election?

  18. If all these super-white enclaves were in super-Republican states like Idaho it would not have mattered as much. What do you think happened in super-White enclaves in swing states?*

  19. Given the racism and xenophobia of places like Dravosborg, explain whether you believe Democrats could possibly defeat Trump in 2020?

  20. Edsall writes, "The core of Trump’s support lies in counties and municipalities like Dravosburg and Elk County, many of which are losing population. They are, in effect, the last gasp of white hegemony." Do you think he's right or will white hegemony continue in America?

Learning Extension

Read Edsall's White-On-White Voting story.

Action Extension

Do one of the following.

Try to make a connection to someone who lives in a place like Dravosburg or Elk County, mostly separate from the growing diversification of America, and explain to them how diversity has impacted your life.

Have you ever integrated a 85% plus white area? Share your story in class or online.

Make a comment on the comments section of the Thomas Edsall article. Share your comment in class or online.

Bonus Chart*

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Bonus Caption Contest

Look at the photograph below. Imagine a thought bubble above the baby in Trump's arms. What's the baby thinking? "Goodnight White Hegemony!" "I see White People!" or something like that. Or get super creative and make the thought bubble coming out of President Trump's head. Share your comment in the comments section below. The best comment will win a certificate of commendation and widespread praise on this website!

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White like Congress

What nonwhite race/ethnicity has the most members in the current U.S. House and Senate?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What most surprised you about this information?

  3. What has been the biggest change in nonwhite Congressional makeup over the past 16 years?

  4. When the 79th Congress took office in 1945, nonwhites represented just 1% of the House and Senate. Today, 19% of Congress is nonwhite. Why do you think Congress is becoming more diverse than it once was?

  5. What is one consequence of the nonwhiting (growing diversity) of Congress?

  6. There are more Hispanics than Blacks in America today, yet there are more Black members of Congress than there are Hispanic members of Congress. Why do you think that is?*

  7. Which racial/ethnic group (including Whites) is the most over represented in Congress?*

  8. Which racial/ethnic group (including Whites) is the most underrepresented in Congress?*

  9. Racial diversity differs significantly by chamber: The House is 22% nonwhite, while minorities make up 10% of the Senate. Explain this difference in less than 708 words:

  10. Which emoji would best express your feelings about of this chart?

  11. Let's say you wanted to make a title for this chart. What would it be?

  12. The current Congress is the most racially and ethnically diverse ever. Nonwhites – including blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders and Native Americans – now account for 19% of Congress (and 34% of its freshman class). Predict how diverse  Congress will be in 20 years:

  13. Explain which Congress was more likely to represent the interests of nonwhite America: the 79th Congress (1% nonwhite) or the 115th Congress (19% nonwhite):

  14. How do you think the nonwhiting of the Congress is impacting party control of Congress?

  15. While racial diversity on Capitol Hill has been growing, Congress still lags behind the nation as a whole, which is 38% nonwhite – twice the share of Congress. Why do you think the Congress does not look like the US in terms of race/ethnicity?

  16. In what other demographic way (race, sex, religion, age) is Congress most unlike America?

  17. How much have demographic changes in the American public impacted the rise of Trump and White supremacy?

Bonus Charts*

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Learning Extension

Check out these 5 charts from the Pew Report on the changing demographics of the 115th Congress!

Action Extension

Research the racial makeup of your U.S. House district and of your state. Research the racial makeup of your U.S. Senators and your U.S. House representative. Share your results in class or in the comments section below.

Does Your Religion Like to Party?

AP US Government and Politics

In 2016, what religious affiliation was the most Republican and what was the most Democratic?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What most surprised you about this data?

  3. What is the big story here?

  4. If you had to make a generalization about religion and Republican voters what would it be?

  5. If you had to make a generalization about religion and Democratic voters what would it be?

  6. Many pundits say that America is a very divided country. What does this data say about that?

  7. Why do you think White evangelicals like Republicans so much?

  8. Why do you think religiously unaffiliated voters like Democrats so much?

  9. What does this data say about race in America?

  10. Donald Trump has been married 3 times and has never been an outwardly religious person. In fact this year, campaigning at Liberty University, he incorrectly referred to Second Corinthians as, "Two Corinthians". If you don't know why that's funny, ask your teacher. Why do you think White Evangelicals were so supportive of Donald Trump in the 2016 election?

  11. What was the biggest change in party affiliation for any group from 2006 to 2016?

  12. What exactly does religiously unaffiliated mean?

  13. How do you think these different religious groups compare by age?*

  14. If you were a Republican strategist, what about this data would make you happy and what would make you worried?

  15. If you were a Democratic strategist, what about this data would make you happy and what would make you worried?

*Bonus Chart

Learning Extension

Read the entire story at 538.com

Action Extension

Survey at least ten people. find out their religious affiliation (or lack thereof) and their political party leaning (between Donald J. Trump v Hillary R. Clinton). Share your findings in class or online.

 

Trump v. NFL

AP US Government and Politics

President Trump said that the NFL should fire athletes who kneel during the national anthem. What percentage of Americans agree that the NFL should fire these athletes?

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  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. How surprising is this information?

  3. What is the big story the data tells?

  4. Why do you think that is?

  5. How does political party identification impact the data?

  6. Do you personally think the NFL should fire the athletes who kneel during the national anthem?

  7. Colin Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback who, starting in 2016, had been kneeling during the pre-game singing of the national anthem said, “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color,” Kaepernick explained. “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.” Why do you think these athletes are kneeling?

  8. Do you think that peaceful non-violent protest is a good way to call attention to important issues?

  9. Voltaire has been credited with saying, "I disapprove of what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it." Whether or not you agree with why the athletes are kneeling, do you agree with their right to kneel?

  10. Last Friday, at a rally for Alabama senatorial candidate Luther Strange, who the President endorsed and who subsequently lost the primary election runoff, Donald Trump said, "Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now, out? He’s fired,’” He continued. “You know, some owner is going to do that. He’s gonna say, ‘That guy disrespects our flag, he’s fired.’ And that owner, they don’t know it. They don’t know it. They’re friends of mine, many of them. They don’t know it. They’ll be the most popular person, for a week. They’ll be the most popular person in the country.” Why do you think Trump took such a strong position against the NFL players who kneel during the national anthem?

  11. You may disagree with me, but before Trump weighed in on this issue last Friday, kneeling before a football game seemed to be slowly fading away. In fact, in the weekend before Trump's comment only 4 players kneeled or sat during the national anthem, and only two raised their fists. Now almost the entire league and owners are kneeling. Do you think Trump was wise to reignite this debate, and do you think he is winning the fight?

  12. Would you say that by calling a peaceful nonviolent protester a "son of a bitch," Trump is acting presidential?

  13. Should politicians talk about sports; also, should athletes talk about politics?

  14. Whether or not you agree with the NFL kneelers, do you think that their tactic worked and drew attention to their cause?

  15. Why do you think so many NFL owners, even some who had donated millions of dollars to the Trump campaign, kneeled with their players in solidarity?

  16. Explain your own decision about whether to kneel during the Star Spangled Banner?

  17. What is the national anthem about anyway?

  18. Do NFL owners have the right to fire their employees for political speech?

  19. Should NFL owners have the right to fire their employees for political speech?

  20. How has this issue impacted your own school or community?

  21. Is it fair to say that if most of the original kneelers had been white, Trump would not have attacked them?

  22. Explain whether Colin Kaepernick is more of a hero or a traitor:

  23. Do you think that Colin Kaepernick would be playing quarterback in the NFL right now had he never kneeled during the national anthem?

  24. How do you think the following demographics impacted opinion on this issue?

  • political party affiliation

  • age

  • race

  • gender

Create your survey with SurveyMonkey

Learning Extension

Read and listen to the Star Spangled Banner. Did you kneel?

Action Extension

The next time you go to a sporting event, notice who kneels (on the field or in the stands) during the national anthem. Ask five people why they didn't kneel and ask five people why they did kneel (if that many did), and share your observations in class or online.

Cartoon Extension

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Bonus Cartoon Questions

  1. What is the cartoonist's opinion?

  2. Do you agree with the cartoonist?

P.S.

A little history from our friends at 538.com

Marches for civil rights during the 1960s were generally seen negatively at the time. As the Washington Post noted last year, most Americans didn’t approve of the Freedom Riders, the March on Washington in 1963 or other similar protests. In fact, many Americans thought that these protests would hurt the advancement of civil rights. In addition, but many Americans held mixed-to-negative views of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. In a 1966 Gallup survey, 63 percent of Americans gave King a negative score on a scale from -5 to +5. Now, the civil rights marches are viewed as major successes, and just 4 percent of Americans rated King negatively on that same scale in a 2011 Gallup poll.

 

 

 

Education Disintegration

What % of Black students in the south go to schools where Whites are the majority?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What story does the chart tell?

  3. Do you go to an integrated school?

  4. Do you believe schools should be integrated?

  5. What are two consequences of segregated schools?

  6. If these trends continue, according to your calculations, what percentage of Black students will attend White schools by 2020?

  7. What caused the original increase in school integration?

  8. What do you think the government could do to increase integration today?

  9. What questions do you have about this chart?

  10. What do you think is causing the re-segregation of schools today?

  11. Is there anything you could do about the re-segregation of education?

  12. If you are on Twitter send a 140 character tweet to summarize this chart to #apgopo

  13. What do you think Donald Trump would have to say about this chart?

  14. In the comments section, describe your school in terms of race:


Learning Extension

Learn more about the re-segregation of schools with a series of great charts at PBS Frontline.


Action Extension

Mix It Up At Lunch is a national campaign that encourages students to identify, question and cross social boundaries. Schools participate on the last Tuesday in October each school year! Learn more and spearhead the organization of Mix It Up At Lunch at your school.

Racial Resentment

What percent of Trump voters surveyed were found to have a high level of racial resentment?

*You will find some of the questions that determine racial resentment scores below.

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. How surprising is this information?

  3. What is the big story this chart tells?

  4. How do you explain this chart?

  5. What is one consequence of this chart?

  6. Overall, is this chart good news or bad news?

  7. What was some of Trump's campaign rhetoric that would have appealed to voters with a high racial resentment?

  8. Based on the fact that over 80% of Trump supporters have a high level of racial resentment, what policies do you imagine he will enact?

  9. Above all, what do you think is the number one reason Donald Trump won the electoral vote?

  10. How do you think you would personally score on a survey of racial resentment?

  11. Explain why you think most whites have high racial resentment?

  12. What questions do you have about this?


Learning Extension

Check out Daniel Byrd & Loren Collingwood's racial resentment survey and analysis.


Action Extension

Researchers asked a national sample of registered voters four "symbolic racism" *questions, culled from a list of six in the University of Michigan's Donald Kinder and University of Virginia's Lynn Sanders's book Divided By Color. Specifically, Morning Consult asked respondents if they agreed that:

  1. Irish, Italian, Jewish, and many other minorities overcame prejudice and worked their way up. Black people should do the same without any special favors.

  2. It’s really a matter of some people not trying hard enough; if black people would only try harder they could be just as well-off as whites.

  3. Over the past few years, black people have gotten less than they deserve.

  4. Generations of slavery and discrimination have created conditions that make it difficult for black people to work their way out of the lower class.

For the first two questions, agreeing is seen as a sign of racial resentment, whereas for the latter two, disagreeing is.

Answer the four questions above and share your racial resentment score in the comments section below, with your friends on social media, or with your class.


Bonus Charts

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Voter Turnout by Race

¿In the 2012 presidential election, what racial group had the highest voter turnout?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. What most surprised you about the data?

  3. Why do you think Black voters had the highest voting rate in 2012?

  4. Explain one reason that Blacks and Whites generally vote at much higher rates than Hispanics or Asians?

  5. What is one consequence of these different voter turnout rates?

  6. Is this good news or bad news?

  7. How much has the overall voter turnout rate changed over the 24 years depicted in this chart?

  8. Based on the data in the chart, predict what voter turnout rates will look like 20 years from now.

  9. If you were the head of a political party (you aren't), how might the data from the chart influence the kind of person you would choose to run for president in 2016?

  10. What do you imagine voter turnout rates were like for non-Whites back in the 1940s and 1950s?

  11. Even the highest voter turnout rate is less than 2/3 of any racial group. In the comments section, describe one component of the US voting process that limits voter turnout:


Learning Extension

Read the entire earth shattering Pew Report on Voter Turnout in the 2012 election.


Action Extension

In the past few years, my state, North Carolina, has worked very hard to make voting more difficult, especially for Black voters. Think about one thing your state legislature could do to increase, instead of decrease voter turnout and contact your state legislator to tell them what they should do.

Race Relations

¿Do most Americans think race relations in the United States are generally good or generally bad?

  1. How accurate was your prediction?

  2. How surprised are you by this data?

  3. What story does the chart tell?

  4. Do you think race relations in the United States are generally good or generally bad?

  5. What leads you to that conclusion?

  6. Do you think race relations in the your school are generally good or generally bad? 

  7. If the trends from the chart continue, what will race relations be like in one decade?

  8. What explains the rapid changes evident in this chart?

  9. What questions do you have about this information?

  10. In the comments section, list one thing the US government could do to improve race relations?


Learning Extension

Read more analysis of this poll at the NY Times.


Action Extension

Post this chart on social media and ask your friends to to respond their explanation to the question.


Bonus Poll